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General Hands Uncategorized

Smoking & Your Hands: 16 Statistics, Factors, and Facts You Might Not Realize

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Even though cigarette smoking has greatly declined in recent years, nearly 40 million U.S. adults still smoke, according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. We don’t need to rehash all the dangers of smoking as it relates to your overall health, as we’re sure you have heard them time and time again. What the media might not talk about as much, however, is how smoking affects your hands.

Some of the effects of smoking on your hands are obvious, such as the scent and the stains. You almost couldn’t ignore those if you tried.  And then there are the effects you might certainly feel but not associate with smoking at all.

Consider the following facts, according to sources such as the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.

1. Studies show that smokers have decreased blood flow in the skin of their fingers as compared to non-smokers.

2. Smokers have increased vascular resistance, which means the vessels are tighter, most likely because smoking increases the amount of adrenaline in the body.

3. Scleroderma patients who smoke have a four times higher chance of having vascular problems in the fingers.

4. Skin wounds heal slower in fingers exposed to cigarette smoke and nicotine.

5. Smokers are twice as likely have wounds that will not heal.

6. Smokers are twice as likely to have wound infections.

7. Smokers are almost twice as likely to develop infections in the hands.

8. The skin of your hands may wrinkle and age prematurely. This is because the chemicals in cigarette smoke damage collagen and elastin, which are responsible for making the skin look supple, firm, and healthy.

9. Hand fractures may take longer to heal in smokers vs. non-smokers.

10. Smoking can lead to general tingling, numbness, and pain in your hands.

11. Smokers who have conditions such as diabetes may have even greater tingling, numbness, and pain in their hands.

12. The flame from a cigarette lighter may accidentally burn the tips of your fingers.

13. Congenital hand problems such as extra fingers or fused fingers are more common when the child’s mother smoked while pregnant.

14. Dupuytren’s contracture is more common in smokers.

15. Complex regional pain syndrome may be more likely in smokers.

16. Smoking is a risk factor for psoriasis.

In addition to all these possible effects on your hands, elbow pain may also be more common in smokers.

But here’s the good news: When you stop smoking, many of these effects can be reversed, minimized, or prevented. At the very least, quitting smoking may stop the progression of these effects on the hands.

If you do experience chronic hand pain for any reason, make an appointment to see Dr. Arora in Warren, Howell, Macomb Township, or West Bloomfield.

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General

Looking for a Hand Doctor in Warren? There’s a New Man in Town

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Are you looking for a hand doctor in Warren?

Although we’ve been in practice for many years, we’re new to this Macomb County community, so we thought we would tell you a little more about us and the services we offer.

Let’s start with the basics: the lowdown on our fearless leader. … OK, maybe we can’t dish it out here, but we’ll tell you when we see you.

We say that with nothing but respect, of course. We think he’s the best, and we bet you will as well. And, fortunately for us, he has a great sense of humor too.

Dr. Avery Arora: The Newest Hand Doctor in Warren, Michigan

Dr. Arora has been recognized as a top hand surgeon in Michigan year after year. Other medical professionals chose Dr. Arora as an HOUR Detroit Magazine “Top Doc” in 2013 and 2015 through 2020. And now, he has been recognized with the honor for 2021 as well.

So that makes seven consecutive years and counting, plus one. Yup, you’ll need two hands to keep track.

Dr. Arora has lived in Michigan since 2005. His wife is from Saginaw, and they have three children.

Dr. Arora has hospital privileges at top hospitals throughout the state, including Ascension Macomb-Oakland, located in Warren. He also has privileges at the following:

  • Ascension St. John
  • Ascension St. John Hospital Health Center at 23 Mile
  • Ascension St. John Hospital Health Center at 12 Mile
  • Ascension Providence, Southfield and Novi
  • Novi Surgery Center
  • Joseph Mercy Oakland
  • Waterford Surgical Center
  • DMC Huron Valley-Sinai

He obtained his doctoral degree from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, and he has specialty training in the following areas:

  • Hand treatment and surgery
  • Wrist treatment and surgery
  • Elbow treatment and surgery

He is certified in Surgery of the Hand from the American Board of Surgery and is Board Certified in Surgery from the American Board of Surgery.

In other words, he can perform many types of surgeries, but treating the hands, wrists, and elbows is his favorite. If you have any issues from the tips of your fingers to your elbows, you’ll be in good hands here in our Warren office, located on Schoenherr Road between 12 Mile and I-696, as well as at our locations in Howell, West Bloomfield, and Macomb Township.

Dr. Avery Arora, a hand doctor in Macomb County, Michigan, is shown here with three members of his team.

Hand, Elbow & Wrist Treatment at Our Warren, Michigan Office

As a leading hand doctor in Warren, West Bloomfield, Howell, and Macomb Township, Dr. Arora treats a wide variety of conditions affecting the hand, wrist, and elbow.

Whether it’s a temporary finger sprain or a chronic condition that requires ongoing treatment, you can rely on Dr. Arora and the rest of the team to diagnose and treat your condition with compassion, integrity, and skill.

Some of the many conditions we treat include:

Contact us if you want to know more about our new office or any of our services.

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General Hands

Claw Hand Deformity: Causes and Treatment Options

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A claw hand deformity can result in many physical and emotional challenges. Feeling insecure about the appearance of the hand, experiencing pain and stiffness, and being unable to complete certain everyday tasks can take their toll on the individuals.

Treatment for claw hand deformity may be possible if it is truly negatively affecting someone’s quality of life. In some cases, surgery for a claw hand may have more negatives than positives, so it’s something you should talk about with Dr. Arora. Make an appointment to speak with the hand doctor in Macomb, Howell, West Bloomfield, or Warren to better understand your options.

In the meantime, following are answers to a few questions you may have about claw hand deformity.

What is a Claw Hand Deformity, and What Causes It?

A claw hand is a deformity in which one or more fingers are bent into a position that makes the hand look like a claw. The condition may affect one or both hands.

It is considered a complete hand deformity when it involves all the fingers due to conditions such as ulnar and median nerve palsy. A partial deformity that affects the two fingers controlled by the ulnar nerve is known as an isolated ulnar nerve palsy.

The condition occurs when there is weakness or paralysis of hand muscles that are responsible for straightening the fingers. It is usually related to damage to a nerve that starts at the neck. However, there are many possible causes of claw hand deformity, which may be present at birth or appear later in life. They include:

  • Nerve damage in the arm, such as ulnar palsy or cubital tunnel syndrome
  • Congenital birth defect
  • Specific genetic diseases
  • Certain bacterial infections
  • Trauma to the hand

A claw hand deformity is sometimes referred to as an “ape hand deformity,” although that term is very insensitive and politically incorrect.

Signs and symptoms of this condition include weakened muscles, numbness along the applicable nerve, and inability to move the thumb outward, straighten the fingers, or move the ring finger and pinky and other fingers that may be affected.

Diagnosing the Condition

Several other conditions have similar signs and symptoms. When you see the hand doctor, he will make efforts to eliminate the other possibilities in order to properly diagnose your condition. Other possibilities include but are not limited to:

  • Dupuytren’s contracture, which can cause lumps and pits in the palm of the hand and force the fingers to bend into the palm.
  • Cervical radiculopathy, which is an umbrella term to describe several conditions related to the inflammation or damage of a nerve root in the neck/cervical spine.
  • Klumpke paralysis, a rare birth injury to the nerves around a newborn’s shoulder.
  • Lower brachial plexopathy, which occurs when a group of nerves in the neck and arms do not operate correctly, resulting in a lack of movement in the arm and shoulder.

In order to diagnose a claw hand deformity, the hand doctor may recommend an electromyography and nerve condition studies.

Claw Hand Treatment Options

Claw hand can be treated through physical therapy, splinting, or surgery, such as a tendon transfer/graft.

Physical therapy has been shown to be highly effective in minimizing the effects of the condition. These include specific types of stretches as well as hand strengthening exercises.

Surgical options may be suitable if they would treat the underlying condition that is causing the claw hand deformity. If the condition is due to a serious burn or injury, for example, treating the burn may help.

However, if the condition was present at birth, surgical options could have negative effects, so talk with Dr. Arora to see if he would advise surgery in this case.

To discuss your options, schedule an appointment to see the hand surgeon at the southeast Michigan location closest to you.

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Fingers General

What Happens if You Cut or Damage a Nerve in Your Finger?

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Even the thought of cutting a nerve in your finger can send a chill up your spine. If you truly do cut the nerve itself, this really is as serious as it sounds, and you should seek care as soon as possible. The sooner you get help for a damaged nerve in your finger, the more likely it is that full functionality can be restored.

However, if the injury is not deep enough to sever the nerve, your hand can usually heal itself without surgery, although you still should seek emergency treatment when necessary.

What are nerves, really?

“This is getting on my nerves.”

“You really cut a nerve with that comment.”

“I’m nervous.”

Do these phrases and idioms really relate to what nerves really are and what they do? Well, yes, they do — in a sense — when you think of it in terms of nerves sending signals to your brain, which controls your emotions.

In simple terms, the body has two primary nervous systems: the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. The central nervous system includes the brain and spinal cord. The peripheral nervous system is located outside of this area throughout the body.

Peripheral nerves transmit electric impulses into or away from the central nervous system as a form of communication. It’s essentially a communication network.

The peripheral nervous system consists of more than 100 billion nerve cells, or neurons. They run throughout the body like wires, connecting the brain to other parts of the body or various parts of the body with each other.

The peripheral nerves are made of bundles of nerve fibers, which are wrapped with layers of tissue that form what is known as the myelin sheath. The myelin sheath is responsible for speeding up nerve impulses, the intensity of which vary depending on their and the amount of tissue around them.

This drawing shows the three main nerves of the hand: the ulnar nerve, the median nerve, and the radial nerve.

How many nerves are in your hands?

Although there are a countless number of nerve cells, there are three primary nerve systems in your hands, wrists, and arms.

1. Ulnar nerve

The ulnar nerve is located at the pinky finger and the adjacent side of the ring finger. It provides sensations on the palm side of the hand. It travels up through the elbow and is responsible for the pain we feel when we bump our elbow.

2. Radial nerve

The radial nerve is responsible for sensations at the back of the hand at the little finger and the other half of the ring finger.

3. Median nerve

The median nerve starts at the shoulder and enters the hand through the carpal tunnel in the wrist. The median nerve is responsible for sensations in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and part of the ring finger.

What happens if you cut or damage a nerve in your finger?

Many of us are familiar with the throbbing pain of a cut or injured finger. If you cut your finger and it is bleeding, the first step is to apply pressure to stop the bleeding. If the bleeding does not stop, you should go to your nearest hospital or urgent care facility, as you may need stitches.

If the sheath that covers the nerve remains intact after a cut, only the nerves farthest from the brain will be affected and die. (In other words, the deeper the cut, the closer it is to the nerve itself.) However, those can heal and grow back over time. Surgery is usually not necessary, but you will need to have the injury addressed by a medical professional for optimal healing.

If the injury is deep enough, you should seek emergency care as soon as possible, which may entail surgery to reattach the severed ends of the nerve sheath to one another.

In some cases, the cut may be deep enough that it damages the nerve itself. If that happens, the gap between the two parts of the nerve will have to be repaired, usually through a nerve graft from another part of the body. Another possibility is using a synthetic nerve conduit to bridge the gap in the nerve.

If the nerve in your finger was damaged due to a crushing injury, you may have to wait for the initial crush trauma to heal before the nerve damage can be addressed.

If you have damaged or cut a nerve in your finger, it’s important to seek care as soon as possible. If the need for treatment is urgent, go to your nearest emergency room. Otherwise, contact one of our hand surgery offices, located in West Bloomfield, Warren, Howell, and Macomb, for treatment as soon as possible.

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Conditions General Hands

What is the Difference Between Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis?

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The differences between osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are significant, but the ability to identify one over the other can be somewhat elusive to the general public. A proper diagnosis is crucial for effective arthritis treatment.

The symptoms of these two common forms of arthritis may be similar, but the conditions are actually very different.

The word “arthritis” itself isn’t as much of a diagnosis as a description of more than 100 different types of ailments that involve joint pain or inflammation. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are two of the most common forms. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 32.5 million U.S. adults suffer from osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis affects more than 1.3 million adults in the U.S.

To help you communicate your concerns to Dr. Arora, we offer the following comparison as a guide.

What is Osteoarthritis?

In very general terms, osteoarthritis occurs when cartilage in a joint wears out. It usually begins in one joint and may never affect other joints.

The pain can be mild, moderate, or severe. Moderate or severe osteoarthritis pain can make it difficult for patients to complete everyday activities, such as buttoning a shirt or tying their shoes.

It is most common among women and occurs more frequently as people get older. Other risk factors for osteoarthritis include obesity, genetics, and joint injury or overuse.

What is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease. When this occurs, the immune system essentially “malfunctions” and attacks the synovial membrane that encases and protects the joints. It frequently affect several joints at the same time.

Beyond the pain, inflammation, and swelling common in other forms of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis symptoms may include fever, anemia, fatigue, and loss of appetite. Rheumatoid arthritis may also show signs in the skin, eyes, lungs, heart, kidneys, salivary glands, nerve tissue, bone marrow, and blood vessels. It tends to be symmetrical, so symptoms may occur on both sides of the body simultaneously.

This form of arthritis is a chronic condition. There is no cure, and it is likely to progress over time. However, treatment options can reduce pain, make the symptoms manageable, and prevent significant joint damage.

Women are more likely to develop RA than men are. RA can begin at any age but most commonly starts in middle age. Other risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis include family history, smoking, and excess weight.

4 Key Differences Between Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

1. Number of Joints Affected

Osteoarthritis may only affect one joint. Rheumatoid arthritis may affect several at the same time.

2. Symmetry

Rheumatoid arthritis tends to be symmetrical, meaning it affects both elbows, for instance. Osteoarthritis is more centralized, so it might or might not affect both sides of the body.

However, both sides of the body may become affected due to the exertion of too much pressure on one side. For example, if you experience osteoarthritis pain in your left wrist, you may use your right wrist more often, eventually causing the right wrist to act up as well.

3. Duration of Symptoms

The duration and extent of the pain is different.

With RA, joint pain and swelling can come and go, but the disease never really goes away. The goal of rheumatoid arthritis treatment is to make you feel better and get your symptoms under control, known as “remission.”

Osteoarthritis is also permanent and the pain and swelling are similar, but the condition can improve over time.

4. Additional Symptoms

Rheumatoid arthritis may have symptoms such as fever, fatigue, anemia, and loss of appetite. Osteoarthritis is usually only pain, swelling, and some loss of flexibility in the particular joint that is affected at the time.

If you are experiencing arthritis pain in your hands, wrists, or elbows, it’s important to determine the type of arthritis in order to create the best treatment and prevention plan for you. For an evaluation, diagnosis, and arthritis treatment, make an appointment to see Dr. Arora in Warren, West Bloomfield, Howell, or Macomb Township.

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General

How to Find the Right Hand Surgeon in Howell for You

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If you are looking for a hand surgeon in Howell, you may feel somewhat overwhelmed.

Where do I begin? Should I look for a hand specialist, or will a general practitioner be better? Do all hand doctors offer the same services? Is my condition even about my hands, or is it something else?

Finding a Hand Surgeon in Howell

Answering these questions is the key to finding the right local hand specialist for you. Although each patient and every case is different, following are several tips to help you find the best hand doctor to diagnose and treat your particular condition.

Do I need a hand specialist, or would a general doctor be able to help?

You can certainly go to your general practitioner to discuss your conditions. However, if your symptoms truly stem from your hands, wrists, elbows, or elsewhere in your arm, you may be referred to a hand specialist. A hand specialist will then be able to:

Are all hand doctors the same?

Hand doctors may provide similar services, but it’s important to look for a hand surgeon in the Howell area with many years of experience. An experienced specialist will likely offer more comprehensive services and be able to more easily identify sources of your problems in order to diagnose your condition. Experience is also the key for efficiency, better results, and optimal recovery.

How do I find the right hand surgeon near me?

Do your research not only online, but by using good, old-fashioned word-of-mouth. Talk to people you know who have been treated by a hand doctor to see if they would recommend that doctor. When you do have these discussions, remember to ask your friend or family member the following:

  • How efficient were the services? Were they able to see you quickly?
  • Was the office staff welcoming and attentive?
  • Did the doctor greet you with professionalism?
  • Did the doctor take the time to answer all of your questions?
  • Did you feel like the doctor truly cared about you as a person?
  • Do they have modern equipment and technology, and do they seem to keep up to date with modern trends in the industry to ensure their patients get the best services?
  • Was there a hand therapist on staff?
  • How do you feel now? Did you recover?
  • Did you have surgery? Can you tell me about what happened before and after the surgery?
  • Have you had follow-up appointments? Do you visit them regularly? Do you find these appointments beneficial?

In addition to speaking with people who may have visited a hand doctor recently, take some time to do your research online. Review doctors’ websites and read the online reviews.

Reviews can be a very powerful tool, but as you are reviewing them, remember this basic fact about statistics: The more reviews there are, the more accurate they’re likely to be. Don’t let one or two negative reviews sway you when there are dozens of very positive reviews. On the other hand, if you do see a trend of too many similar negative reviews, that may warrant further scrutiny. Finally, gauge what really matters to you as you read the reviews.

Can the doctor treat my specific condition?

Clearly, that’s going to be the most important factor in finding the best hand surgeon in Howell for you. Review the websites or call the offices to find out if they can treat your particular condition.

Is the doctor’s office nearby?

Although it’s not always the most important aspect, convenience is definitely important too, especially if you are undergoing surgery and need someone else to drive you to and from the doctor’s office.

Get to Know Arora Hand Surgery

Once you analyze all of the above factors, we have no doubt that Arora Hand Surgery will be at the top of your list. Dr. Avery Arora, Physician Assistant Ashley, and Occupational Certified Hand Therapist Lodia work together as a comprehensive team to restore and enhance patients’ hand functionality and overall quality of life. With extensive expertise in treating hand, wrist, and elbow conditions, Dr. Arora is recognized as a leading hand surgeon in Howell.

If you need a hand specialist, make an appointment today to see the Arora Hand Surgery team in Howell or one of our three other locations in metro Detroit.

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General Uncategorized

Up and Running: Arora Hand Surgery Opens Office in Warren, Michigan

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We’re finally getting all settled into our newest office, located in Warren, and we hope you love it as much as we do!

Patients from our St. Clair Shores location, which is now closed, are welcome to visit our hand specialty team at our new office at 28295 Schoenherr Road, Suite B. Located between 12 Mile and I-696, the location is convenient for residents of Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne counties.  The phone number remains the same: (586) 209-3210.

You may also visit us at any of our other offices, located in Oakland, Macomb, and Livingston counties.

  • 7011 Orchard Lake Road, Suite 220, in West Bloomfield
  • 1225 S. Latson Road, Suite 380, in Howell
  • 46591 Romeo Plank Road, Suite 105, in Macomb Township

No matter which location is most convenient for you, you can feel confident in our state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment, testing procedures, and friendly, caring team. We will make every effort to keep you informed, comfortable, and safe before, during, and after appointments and treatments.

By the way, since we’re telling you about new changes at Arora Hand Surgery, have you met our new physician assistant, Ashley Delzer (PA-C)? With more than 10 years of experience as an orthopedic surgery physician assistant, she is working hand-in-hand with Dr. Arora to provide our patients with comprehensive diagnoses and treatment. Ashley will be assisting with injections, X-rays, casts, and follow-up and post-operative visits.

When you visit our hand surgery office in Warren or any of our other locations, be sure to say hi! She’s looking forward to getting to know you all better!

Contact us if you want to know more about our new office or any of our services.

 

Categories
Fingers General

How Do Nails Grow Back?

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You clip them one day. They’re back two days later.

You chip one one day. It’s back to normal within a day.

You hit one with a hammer, and the bruise goes away within a few weeks.

You overdo your manicures to the point that the nails become thinner, and they’re back to normal within a month.

You paint them one day … ok, well, that one doesn’t make the nail shorter or thinner, but it’s still one of the many things your nails go through in your lifetime — and yet they’re among the most resilient parts of our bodies.

How in the world? How does it happen? How do nails grow back so easily and look relatively the same? Is there a secret magic chamber hiding in our third knuckles? … And why, oh why, can’t our teeth do the same thing?

How Do Nails Grow Back?

How nails grow back is essentially about science.

Nails start out as living cells, which is why they continue to grow, but they harden and die once they become the nails that we see. That’s why it doesn’t hurt when we clip or file them.

Nails are made of a substance called keratin, which is the same thing that our hair is made of. And that makes sense. Both continue to grow throughout our lives, barring a significant injury or medical conditions.

The cuticles on our fingers and toes serve to protect the roots of the nails, which sit behind the cuticles. The root, or matrix, is a pocket of flesh that is connected to blood vessels that supply the nail with nutrients it needs to make new cells.

Fun fact: A fetus starts to grow nails when it is only 20 weeks old, and the baby’s tiny toes and little fingers have full nails by the time it’s born.

So, no, unless you’re Penn or Teller, there’s no magic in your hands — but the resiliency of our nails is still fascinating.

Can You Completely Lose a Fingernail?

Nails almost always grow back, and that’s the case even after accidentally whacking one with a hammer. It might look a little different, but typically you will get it back.

The reason for that is because it would actually be challenging to get under the root of the nail to the matrix in a manner that damages it for life. It’s a tough little pocket.

Only in very rare circumstances is the entire matrix damaged for good, and if that happens, the nail won’t grow back.

To answer your question about teeth — teeth are not made of keratin, and they’re not even “bone,” contrary to popular belief. They’re made up of enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp.

So, no, as we humans are today, we can’t grow our teeth back … yet. It’s a nice little dream, though, isn’t it?

Categories
Fingers General Hands

Clubbed Thumb Surgery: Is it Possible?

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In many ways, clubbed thumbs or toe thumbs are endearing. They’re short, cute, and would certainly stand out if you’re trying to hitch a ride, so you can leave all those “plain-thumbed” hitchhikers in the dust.

Even though there’s medically nothing wrong with having stubbed thumbs, some of their owners often feel somewhat self-conscious about them.

Truly, there’s no need to feel that way. In fact, Dr. Arora would not advise or perform any type of surgery for clubbed thumbs in 99.99% of the cases he has seen.

However, if you are having trouble gripping or writing or have associated hand conditions, surgery for clubbed thumbs may be possible albeit risky.

Facts About Clubbed Thumb Surgery

Before we get into the basic facts about clubbed thumb surgery, let’s define what a clubbed thumb is.

Also known as a “toe thumb” or “stub thumb,” a clubbed thumb is more formally identified as a Brachydactyly type D skeletal variation. It may also be called “Brachymegalodactylism” . . . such a big word for such a little thumb, right?

Speaking of “little,” a clubbed thumb is simply about 2/3 the size of a longer thumb. The nail bed may be shorter and wider as well. Stub thumbs are genetic, just like the color of someone’s eyes or hair.

There is no simple surgical solution for clubbed thumbs. Risks include scarring, loss of sensation, and abnormal nail growth.

Surgery options for this type of brachydactyly are not formalized in any way in the United States. Some treatments may be completed in other countries, but they are not typical for the U.S.

The primary type of surgery for clubbed thumbs is an osteotomy. During an osteotomy, the bone is cut, and a bone grafting material is used to reshape the thumb, making it longer and narrower as needed.

However, your hand is a complex system. If you were born with clubbed thumbs, they most likely function optimally with the rest of your hand, just like a well-oiled machine. Narrowing the thumb or making it longer may change the dynamics of your hand’s functionality.

Dr. Arora’s philosophy is generally, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Because clubbed thumb surgery is typically not advisable, just keep this in mind. Up to 3 percent of people in any given population have stub thumbs, so you’re not alone. In fact, some very beautiful and famous celebrities have toe thumbs.

If nothing else, consider it a gift — a beautiful feature that highlights how unique you really are.

Schedule a Consultation with our Hand Specialist in Southeast Michigan

If you are experiencing discomfort or pain in your hands, make an appointment to see Dr. Arora in West Bloomfield, Warren, Macomb Township, or Howell.

To make an appointment, call the hand doctor’s West Bloomfield office or send us a message through our website.

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Stories

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Dr. Aroras office from my first call to schedule my appointment was friendly. Walking in the first day, I felt like I was in a nice atmosphere. Dr. Arora was EXCELLENT in taking great care of my hand injury. He was gentle and very understanding to the concerns I had about my hand. His expertise was admirable and I would recommend anyone with an injury to their hand to his office to be under his care. Because of him, I have healed faster than expected and will make an 100% recovery! Thank you Dr.

Jackie S.

I first thought I was going to have to have painful injections or surgery, but Dr. Arora suggested physical therapy may do the trick. I was doubtful, but I agreed to do it. Now, my pain is gone, and with the help of an ergonomic keyboard at work to keep my hands in the correct position, I am virtually pain free. The therapy strengthened my wrists and shoulders, and built more flexibility into my wrists.

Jerry T.

My experience with this doctor was positive from the outset. Dr. Arora was kind and spent a great deal of time with me. Staff was friendly. The office was nice and bright.

Ariel G.

Very friendly and helpful Great staff!!! Doctor Arora was very professional and did great work. I was very happy with everything!

L B.