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General

How to Find the Right Hand Surgeon in Howell for You

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If you are looking for a hand surgeon in Howell, you may feel somewhat overwhelmed.

Where do I begin? Should I look for a hand specialist, or will a general practitioner be better? Do all hand doctors offer the same services? Is my condition even about my hands, or is it something else?

Finding a Hand Surgeon in Howell

Answering these questions is the key to finding the right local hand specialist for you. Although each patient and every case is different, following are several tips to help you find the best hand doctor to diagnose and treat your particular condition.

Do I need a hand specialist, or would a general doctor be able to help?

You can certainly go to your general practitioner to discuss your conditions. However, if your symptoms truly stem from your hands, wrists, elbows, or elsewhere in your arm, you may be referred to a hand specialist. A hand specialist will then be able to:

Are all hand doctors the same?

Hand doctors may provide similar services, but it’s important to look for a hand surgeon in the Howell area with many years of experience. An experienced specialist will likely offer more comprehensive services and be able to more easily identify sources of your problems in order to diagnose your condition. Experience is also the key for efficiency, better results, and optimal recovery.

How do I find the right hand surgeon near me?

Do your research not only online, but by using good, old-fashioned word-of-mouth. Talk to people you know who have been treated by a hand doctor to see if they would recommend that doctor. When you do have these discussions, remember to ask your friend or family member the following:

  • How efficient were the services? Were they able to see you quickly?
  • Was the office staff welcoming and attentive?
  • Did the doctor greet you with professionalism?
  • Did the doctor take the time to answer all of your questions?
  • Did you feel like the doctor truly cared about you as a person?
  • Do they have modern equipment and technology, and do they seem to keep up to date with modern trends in the industry to ensure their patients get the best services?
  • Was there a hand therapist on staff?
  • How do you feel now? Did you recover?
  • Did you have surgery? Can you tell me about what happened before and after the surgery?
  • Have you had follow-up appointments? Do you visit them regularly? Do you find these appointments beneficial?

In addition to speaking with people who may have visited a hand doctor recently, take some time to do your research online. Review doctors’ websites and read the online reviews.

Reviews can be a very powerful tool, but as you are reviewing them, remember this basic fact about statistics: The more reviews there are, the more accurate they’re likely to be. Don’t let one or two negative reviews sway you when there are dozens of very positive reviews. On the other hand, if you do see a trend of too many similar negative reviews, that may warrant further scrutiny. Finally, gauge what really matters to you as you read the reviews.

Can the doctor treat my specific condition?

Clearly, that’s going to be the most important factor in finding the best hand surgeon in Howell for you. Review the websites or call the offices to find out if they can treat your particular condition.

Is the doctor’s office nearby?

Although it’s not always the most important aspect, convenience is definitely important too, especially if you are undergoing surgery and need someone else to drive you to and from the doctor’s office.

Get to Know Arora Hand Surgery

Once you analyze all of the above factors, we have no doubt that Arora Hand Surgery will be at the top of your list. Dr. Avery Arora, Physician Assistant Ashley, and Occupational Certified Hand Therapist Lodia work together as a comprehensive team to restore and enhance patients’ hand functionality and overall quality of life. With extensive expertise in treating hand, wrist, and elbow conditions, Dr. Arora is recognized as a leading hand surgeon in Howell.

If you need a hand specialist, make an appointment today to see the Arora Hand Surgery team in Howell or one of our three other locations in metro Detroit.

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General Uncategorized

Up and Running: Arora Hand Surgery Opens Office in Warren, Michigan

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We’re finally getting all settled into our newest office, located in Warren, and we hope you love it as much as we do!

Patients from our St. Clair Shores location, which is now closed, are welcome to visit our hand specialty team at our new office at 28295 Schoenherr Road, Suite B. Located between 12 Mile and I-696, the location is convenient for residents of Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne counties.  The phone number remains the same: (586) 209-3210.

You may also visit us at any of our other offices, located in Oakland, Macomb, and Livingston counties.

  • 7011 Orchard Lake Road, Suite 220, in West Bloomfield
  • 1225 S. Latson Road, Suite 380, in Howell
  • 46591 Romeo Plank Road, Suite 105, in Macomb Township

No matter which location is most convenient for you, you can feel confident in our state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment, testing procedures, and friendly, caring team. We will make every effort to keep you informed, comfortable, and safe before, during, and after appointments and treatments.

By the way, since we’re telling you about new changes at Arora Hand Surgery, have you met our new physician assistant, Ashley Delzer (PA-C)? With more than 10 years of experience as an orthopedic surgery physician assistant, she is working hand-in-hand with Dr. Arora to provide our patients with comprehensive diagnoses and treatment. Ashley will be assisting with injections, X-rays, casts, and follow-up and post-operative visits.

When you visit our hand surgery office in Warren or any of our other locations, be sure to say hi! She’s looking forward to getting to know you all better!

Contact us if you want to know more about our new office or any of our services.

 

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Fingers General

How Do Nails Grow Back?

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You clip them one day. They’re back two days later.

You chip one one day. It’s back to normal within a day.

You hit one with a hammer, and the bruise goes away within a few weeks.

You overdo your manicures to the point that the nails become thinner, and they’re back to normal within a month.

You paint them one day … ok, well, that one doesn’t make the nail shorter or thinner, but it’s still one of the many things your nails go through in your lifetime — and yet they’re among the most resilient parts of our bodies.

How in the world? How does it happen? How do nails grow back so easily and look relatively the same? Is there a secret magic chamber hiding in our third knuckles? … And why, oh why, can’t our teeth do the same thing?

How Do Nails Grow Back?

How nails grow back is essentially about science.

Nails start out as living cells, which is why they continue to grow, but they harden and die once they become the nails that we see. That’s why it doesn’t hurt when we clip or file them.

Nails are made of a substance called keratin, which is the same thing that our hair is made of. And that makes sense. Both continue to grow throughout our lives, barring a significant injury or medical conditions.

The cuticles on our fingers and toes serve to protect the roots of the nails, which sit behind the cuticles. The root, or matrix, is a pocket of flesh that is connected to blood vessels that supply the nail with nutrients it needs to make new cells.

Fun fact: A fetus starts to grow nails when it is only 20 weeks old, and the baby’s tiny toes and little fingers have full nails by the time it’s born.

So, no, unless you’re Penn or Teller, there’s no magic in your hands — but the resiliency of our nails is still fascinating.

Can You Completely Lose a Fingernail?

Nails almost always grow back, and that’s the case even after accidentally whacking one with a hammer. It might look a little different, but typically you will get it back.

The reason for that is because it would actually be challenging to get under the root of the nail to the matrix in a manner that damages it for life. It’s a tough little pocket.

Only in very rare circumstances is the entire matrix damaged for good, and if that happens, the nail won’t grow back.

To answer your question about teeth — teeth are not made of keratin, and they’re not even “bone,” contrary to popular belief. They’re made up of enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp.

So, no, as we humans are today, we can’t grow our teeth back … yet. It’s a nice little dream, though, isn’t it?

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Fingers General Hands

Clubbed Thumb Surgery: Is it Possible?

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In many ways, clubbed thumbs or toe thumbs are endearing. They’re short, cute, and would certainly stand out if you’re trying to hitch a ride, so you can leave all those “plain-thumbed” hitchhikers in the dust.

Even though there’s medically nothing wrong with having stubbed thumbs, some of their owners often feel somewhat self-conscious about them.

Truly, there’s no need to feel that way. In fact, Dr. Arora would not advise or perform any type of surgery for clubbed thumbs in 99.99% of the cases he has seen.

However, if you are having trouble gripping or writing or have associated hand conditions, surgery for clubbed thumbs may be possible albeit risky.

Facts About Clubbed Thumb Surgery

Before we get into the basic facts about clubbed thumb surgery, let’s define what a clubbed thumb is.

Also known as a “toe thumb” or “stub thumb,” a clubbed thumb is more formally identified as a Brachydactyly type D skeletal variation. It may also be called “Brachymegalodactylism” . . . such a big word for such a little thumb, right?

Speaking of “little,” a clubbed thumb is simply about 2/3 the size of a longer thumb. The nail bed may be shorter and wider as well. Stub thumbs are genetic, just like the color of someone’s eyes or hair.

There is no simple surgical solution for clubbed thumbs. Risks include scarring, loss of sensation, and abnormal nail growth.

Surgery options for this type of brachydactyly are not formalized in any way in the United States. Some treatments may be completed in other countries, but they are not typical for the U.S.

The primary type of surgery for clubbed thumbs is an osteotomy. During an osteotomy, the bone is cut, and a bone grafting material is used to reshape the thumb, making it longer and narrower as needed.

However, your hand is a complex system. If you were born with clubbed thumbs, they most likely function optimally with the rest of your hand, just like a well-oiled machine. Narrowing the thumb or making it longer may change the dynamics of your hand’s functionality.

Dr. Arora’s philosophy is generally, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Because clubbed thumb surgery is typically not advisable, just keep this in mind. Up to 3 percent of people in any given population have stub thumbs, so you’re not alone. In fact, some very beautiful and famous celebrities have toe thumbs.

If nothing else, consider it a gift — a beautiful feature that highlights how unique you really are.

Schedule a Consultation with our Hand Specialist in Southeast Michigan

If you are experiencing discomfort or pain in your hands, make an appointment to see Dr. Arora in West Bloomfield, Warren, Macomb Township, or Howell.

To make an appointment, call the hand doctor’s West Bloomfield office or send us a message through our website.

Categories
General Hands

Hand Muscle Anatomy: How Many Muscles are in the Hand?

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Have you ever really stopped to think about how spectacular your hands are? You use them for just about everything in life — from pumping iron at the gym to pumping gas at the gas station. They can be flat, or they can be clenched into fists. You can wiggle your fingers all around, bend them, and use them to point at someone. Our hands are truly a thing of beauty; there aren’t many other areas of our bodies that can take so many different forms. Just how many muscles are in the hand to enable all this power?

The hand muscle anatomy is very intricate, understandably, and most of the hand movements are actually controlled by the forearms.

How Many Muscles are in the Hand?

There are about 30 hand muscles, most of which lead to the wrists and forearms.

The formal terms for the various types of hand muscles are:

  • Dorsal interossei and palmar interossei muscles
  • Lumbrical muscles
  • Hypothenar muscles, which include abductor, flexor, and opponens digiti minimi
  • Thenar muscles, which include abductor pollicis brevis, flexor pollicis brevis, and opponens pollicis muscles

Technically, there are no muscles in the fingers, with the exceptions of the adductor pollicis and abductor pollicis longus at the base of the thumb.

How many muscles are in the hand? About 30 muscles are in the human hand, including lumbrical muscles as shown in this graphic.
Lumbrical muscles

If that all sounds rather foreign to you, don’t worry. We’ll explain.

1. The interosseous muscles are a network of muscles found on and in between the knuckles that enable us to bend the joints in the fingers. The dorsal muscles are used to spread the fingers, while the palmar muscles are used to bend them.

There are four dorsal interosseous muscles in each hand.

Palmar interossei consist of four muscles each that attach to the first, second, fourth, and fifth fingers. The third finger does not have a palmar interosseous muscle.

2. The lumbrical hand muscles extend to underneath each finger. We use them to straighten our fingers and bend the joints. There are four in each hand.

3. The three muscles on the side of each of your hands near the small finger are the hypothenar muscles. They enable you to move the pinky away from the ring finger, bend the pinky, and make a fist.

4. The thenar muscles are perhaps the most recognizable. They are three short muscles in the thick area of your palm under your thumb. These muscles give the thumb the ability to move the way it does, as well as enable us to grasp items.  (If you’re interested in an additional nugget of medical trivia, the bulge under your thumb is known as hypothenar eminence.)

5. The two muscles near the thumb, the adductor pollicis and abductor pollicis longus, enable us to pinch. One is located between the index finger and thumb, and the other passes through the wrist.

Possible Causes of Hand Muscle Pain

If you are reviewing the anatomy of the hand because you are feeling pain in your hand muscles, you may wish to learn about the most common causes of this pain. They include inflammation, nerve damage, basic overuse, and sprains, fractures, or other traumatic injuries.

Chronic health conditions also can lead to hand pain. They include:

If you have pain in your hand, see our hand specialist at our Warren, West Bloomfield, Macomb Township, or Howell office. Dr. Arora can analyze the skin, joints, and muscles of the hand and recommend tests to identify the source.

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Fingers General

What is the Medical Term for Trigger Finger?

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The phrase “trigger finger” can be rather deceptive. It’s not about spending too much time at the firing range – although that may do it. It actually refers to the shape that the finger takes when you have this condition, as well as the popping or snapping sound the finger
might make when you are finally able to straighten it out.

Understanding the medical term for trigger finger and what the condition is may help clear the air.

What is the Medical Term for Trigger Finger?

Trigger finger occurs when the pulley at the base of the finger becomes too thick and then constricts around the tendon. As a result, it can be hard to move the tendon, and you may feel pain, popping, or a feeling of resistance when you try to straighten the finger. When this happens, the tendon may swell and cause pain, and this can happen repeatedly over time. In some cases, the tendon becomes locked, and it may be hard to move the finger at all.

The medical term for trigger finger is stenosing tenosynovitis.

What does “stenosing” mean?

Stenosing derives from the word stenosis, which is defined as an abnormal narrowing or contraction of a body passage or opening.

Other types of stenoses as used in the medical sense include aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis, spinal stenosis, and tracheal stenosis, among many others.

What does “tenosynovitis” mean?

“Teno” refers to tendon. “Synovitis” refers to inflammation of a synovial membrane, which contains synovial fluid. Synovial fluid is a lubricating fluid secreted by the tendon sheath, which is what allows a healthy finger to move properly.

Tenosynovitis, therefore, literally means “inflammation of a tendon,” as well as its sheath.

It typically occurs in the hands, wrists, feet, and ankles due to intense, repetitive use, such as when playing a piano. In addition to overuse, it may occur due to an injury that leads to infection, as well as tuberculous or gonorrheal infection.

Combine it all together, and you get stenosing tenosynovitis: inflammation of a tendon that causes abnormal narrowing or contraction.

Don’t worry. You can still call it “trigger finger.”

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Elbows General

What is the Difference Between Tennis Elbow and Golfer’s Elbow?

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Elbow pain due to overexertion may feel like it’s coming from all over, and patients really just want the pain gone. The first step in treating elbow pain, however, is to pinpoint the exact location of the problem, which is the primary difference between tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow.

These two common conditions bring many patients into our elbow doctor’s offices in West Bloomfield, Howell, Warren, and Macomb Township every year.

The good news is that both of these conditions are highly treatable with self-care, rest, or the use of an elbow brace. When these remedies are not effective, elbow surgery is an option as well.

What is Tennis Elbow?

Technically called lateral epicondylitis, tennis elbow occurs when the tendons that anchor the muscle to the bone on the outside (lateral) part of the elbow are overused. When these tendons degenerate or become inflamed, it weakens and causes stress on the entire site.

In other words, tennis elbow is caused by a swelling of the tendons that bend your wrist backward away from your palm. People who repeatedly use their elbow and arm muscles may be susceptible to tennis elbow, such as painters, plumbers, and butchers, as well as athletes.

Symptoms of tennis elbow include pain or burning on the outer part of the elbow, as well as a weaker grip. They typically are worsened with forearm activity, such as holding a tennis racquet or turning a wrench. The pain is typically mild at first, but worsens over time if the action that is causing it is not minimized. Tennis elbow is usually not associated with a traumatic injury.

The dominant arm is affected more often than the non-dominant arm.

Tennis elbow can usually be treated with rest, pain medication, Botox injections, or the use of a brace. Tennis elbow surgery may be recommended in more extreme cases.

Tennis elbow occurs due to overuse of the elbow’s outer tendons. This diagram shows the anatomy of the elbow in relation to tennis elbow.
Tennis elbow occurs due to overuse of the elbow’s outer tendons.

What is Golfer’s Elbow?

Golfer’s elbow is more formally called medial epicondylitis. It is sometimes referred to as baseball elbow or suitcase elbow.

The source of the pain is on the inner side of the elbow. It occurs when the tendon that connects the forearm muscles to the bone is overused.

Golfer’s elbow is about twice as common in men than in women. Despite its name, it is caused by general overuse and can affect virtually anyone.

Golfer’s elbow also can be treated with rest, pain medication, injections, and the use of a brace.

The main difference between tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow is the location of the inflammation. Tennis elbow hurts on the outside. Golfer’s elbow hurts on the inside. In this image, a golfer holds his elbow in pain.
The main difference between tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow is the location of the inflammation. Tennis elbow hurts on the outside. Golfer’s elbow hurts on the inside.

What is the Difference Between Tennis Elbow and Golfer’s Elbow?

While causes and treatments are similar, there are some differences between tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow.

The primary difference is the source of the inflammation. With tennis elbow, the outside of the elbow and forearm areas are inflamed, but with golfer’s elbow, inflammation is on the inner side of the arm and elbow.

Likewise, tennis elbow stems from damage to an outside tendon, and golfer’s elbow is associated with damage to an inner tendon.

Both are forms of elbow tendinitis.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Elbow Pain

For most people, the pain subsides by reducing or eliminating the action that is causing it. Physical therapy to strengthen the muscles in the arms may help as well. When self-care, rest, and the use of pain medications or a brace do not help, surgery may be necessary.

Elbow surgery options include:

  • Open surgery, which requires making an incision at the elbow and is performed on an outpatient basis.
  • Arthroscopic surgery, an outpatient procedure that uses smaller instruments and smaller incisions.

A common surgery to treat golfer’s elbow is called medial epicondyle release. It requires an incision along the arm over the medial epicondyle, and the surgeon’s goal will be to take tension off the flexor tendon.

Similarly, a lateral epicondylitis surgery can be used to treat tennis elbow. The goal of this surgery will be to release a portion of the tendon from the bone, remove the inflamed tendon, or repair tendon tears.

For proper treatment, it’s important to differentiate between tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow. For a diagnosis and treatment plan, make an appointment to see Dr. Arora at one of his southeast Michigan locations.

Categories
General Hands

Protecting Your Hands While Gardening: Tips that May Help Keep You Safer

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May is perhaps the most invigorating month of the entire year. With beautiful gardens, the fragrant scent of freshly tilled dirt, greenery bursting into life all around, and Mother’s Day flowers to color the scene, this month makes you want to get outside to be one with nature. Gardening can be a thrilling and fulfilling hobby, one that we hope you continue to enjoy for many years. For some people, gardening may even bring in the salary.

That’s why we want to remind you about all the ways you should protect your hands while gardening. Oversights or missteps can put a damper on that flowery spirit of yours, but we want to make sure you keep that green thumb up.

Common Gardening-Related Hand Injuries

Some of the most common hand and wrist conditions related to gardening include trigger thumb, wrist tendonitis, hand infections, gamekeeper’s thumb, and minor or traumatic injuries.

  • Trigger Thumb: Trigger thumb occurs when the pulley at the base of the finger becomes too thick, making it hard for the tendon to move freely.
  • Tendonitis: There are several types of tendonitis, which is essentially a torn, pulled, or swollen tendon.
  • Infections: Infections related to gardening include rose thorn disease and Legionnaires’ disease. Other gardening-related concerns are poison oak, poison ivy, and irritation from chemicals.
  • Gamekeeper’s Thumb: Gamekeeper’s thumb occurs when the inner ligament at the base of the thumb is injured due to overuse.
  • Gardening Injuries: Common injuries include cuts, scrapes, and lawnmower or gardening tool accidents. Another is body strain, aches, and pains due to improper posture while gardening.

How to Protect Your Hands While Gardening

Skilled gardeners are familiar with methods of protecting the hands while gardening, as well as how to protect their knees and backs. If you are new to the hobby, however, you should keep the following tips in mind as you head out this May.

  • Wear your gardening gloves, and make sure you choose a high-quality brand. The gloves should be thick and have latex or rubber on the palm side to help prevent splinters and also protect you from the chemicals in soil, Legionnaires’ disease, insect bites, and skin irritants like poison ivy or poison oak. You may even come across rodents underground that might want to take a bite at you. The latex or rubber will also provide support as you grip tools or when you need to use those arm and back muscle to really dig in.
  • Apply sunscreen on your hands, face, ears, neck and other areas of exposed skin before you head out. Choose a broad-spectrum sunscreen with SPF 30 protection or higher. You may also wish to wear thin, light-colored, long-sleeved shirts and long pants to prevent sunburn.
  • Take frequent breaks. If you get too tired or too hot, step away from the task at hand. Repetitive motion can lead to issues such as cubital tunnel syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, and back pain.
  • Take all the necessary precautions when using manual hand tools and electric tools. Read the manuals and use the tools according to manufacturers’ directions. Protect your hands, body, and face when using them, and unplug the tools when you are done. Keep your tools clean, sharp, rust-free, and in proper working condition, which will help prevent strain or accidental injury due to malfunction.
  • Whenever possible, rely on your tools, not your fingers. You may be tempted to shovel or pull weeds with your fingers, but buried objects such as tree roots, glass, and metal can cause injury. Overusing your hands could also damage your fingernails, irritate your skin, and strain your back and arms.
  • Watch your posture. In order to ensure a tighter grip, keep your hands and wrists as straight as possible when you use the gardening tools. Without this sturdy grip, you will find yourself overusing your hand, wrist, and arm muscles unnecessarily.
  • In addition to protecting your hands while gardening, it’s important to follow general safety tips.
    • Sip water throughout the day to prevent hydration.
    • Keep children and pets away from dangerous tools.
    • Do not leave dangerous gardening tools in harm’s way.
    • Watch your surroundings before making abrupt movements.
    • Use knee pads if you will be kneeling.

If you do find that you overworked your hands or if you experienced a gardening injury, make an appointment to see our hand specialist in Warren, West Bloomfield, Macomb Township, or Howell. In the event of life-threatening injuries or other emergencies, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room.

We want you to enjoy your hobby for years to come, so stay safe out there!

Categories
Elbows General

5 Common Conditions that May Require Elbow Surgery

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Most elbow pain is temporary, but persistent pain or discomfort that affects your quality of life may require elbow surgery.

We treat several common conditions that may require elbow surgery at our southeast Michigan offices. Make an appointment to see our elbow surgeon in Macomb Township, Warren, Howell, or West Bloomfield for the following treatments or a diagnosis of your condition.

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome Surgery

Cubital tunnel syndrome occurs when there is too much pressure on the ulnar nerve, which runs along the ulna bone in the forearm and enters the hand near the pinky and ring fingers.

Causes of cubital tunnel syndrome include leaning on hand surfaces or bending the elbow for an extended period of time, or you may develop cubital tunnel syndrome due to an anomaly in the anatomy of your elbow. If you have this condition, you may experience severe pain and numbness in the elbow, as well as tingling or weakness in your ring and pinky fingers. It may become difficult to close your hand.

The first line of treatment for cubital tunnel syndrome is to avoid the action that is causing the pain. Using pain relief medications and wearing a splint at night may help as well.

When self-treatment does not help, cubital tunnel syndrome surgery may be recommended. The goal is to relieve the pressure by releasing and moving the ulnar nerve to the front of the elbow or increasing the size of the cubital tunnel.

Tennis Elbow Surgery & Other Treatment Options

Known as tennis elbow, lateral epicondylitis is a painful condition involving the tendons that attach to the bone on the outside (lateral) part of the elbow. The tendon’s attachment to the bone degenerates, which places increased stress on the area.

People who repeatedly use their elbow and arm muscles may be susceptible to tennis elbow, such as painters, plumbers, and butchers.

Tennis elbow can usually be treated with rest, pain medication, Botox injections, or the use of a brace. Tennis elbow surgery may be recommended in more extreme cases.

Elbow Fracture Examination & Treatment

Elbow fractures may occur due to a fall or direct impact. Pain, swelling, bruising, and stiffness in and around the elbow suggest a possible fracture. A snap or pop at the time of injury may be felt or heard as well.

Types of elbow fractures include:

  • Olecranon fractures
  • Fractures of the distal humerus
  • Radial head and neck fractures of the elbow

Depending on the type of injury and its severity, treatment options for elbow fractures include splint immobilization, casting the elbow, physical therapy, surgery to realign the bone fragments, and external fixation to stabilize the fractures.

Olecranon Bursitis Surgery & Assessment

The olecranon is the pointy bone at the tip of the elbow. A small sac of fluid called a “bursa” covers the tip of this bone. Sometimes this area gets irritated and the body makes extra fluid inside the sac, causing a big “balloon” that looks like a golf ball to form at the tip of the elbow.

Causes of olecranon bursitis include hitting the elbow on an object, overuse of the elbow, systemic diseases, and medical procedures.

It’s usually not painful, but it sometimes becomes infected. Remedies include using a splint and compression to rest the bursa, using elbow pads, using antibiotics to clear the infection, having cortisone injections, or drawing fluid out of the bursa with a needle in a procedure known as aspiration.

Olecranon bursitis surgery may be required if other remedies are not successful.

Golfer’s Elbow Treatment

Golfer’s elbow causes and treatments are similar to that of tennis elbow, but there are some differences between the two conditions.

The primary difference is the source of the inflammation. With tennis elbow, the outside of the elbow and forearm areas are inflamed, but with golfer’s elbow, inflammation is on the inner side of the arm and elbow.

Likewise, tennis elbow stems from damage to an outside tendon, and golfer’s elbow is associated with damage to an inner tendon.

Golfer’s elbow is more formally called medial epicondylitis, and it is sometimes referred to as baseball elbow or suitcase elbow.

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Dr. Aroras office from my first call to schedule my appointment was friendly. Walking in the first day, I felt like I was in a nice atmosphere. Dr. Arora was EXCELLENT in taking great care of my hand injury. He was gentle and very understanding to the concerns I had about my hand. His expertise was admirable and I would recommend anyone with an injury to their hand to his office to be under his care. Because of him, I have healed faster than expected and will make an 100% recovery! Thank you Dr.

Jackie S.

I first thought I was going to have to have painful injections or surgery, but Dr. Arora suggested physical therapy may do the trick. I was doubtful, but I agreed to do it. Now, my pain is gone, and with the help of an ergonomic keyboard at work to keep my hands in the correct position, I am virtually pain free. The therapy strengthened my wrists and shoulders, and built more flexibility into my wrists.

Jerry T.

My experience with this doctor was positive from the outset. Dr. Arora was kind and spent a great deal of time with me. Staff was friendly. The office was nice and bright.

Ariel G.

Very friendly and helpful Great staff!!! Doctor Arora was very professional and did great work. I was very happy with everything!

L B.