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Fingers

Removing a Ring from a Swollen Finger

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Over the years, your hands change due to factors such as aging, pregnancy, and injuries. Fingers can become swollen versions of what they once were, and conditions like arthritis only make those symptoms worse. No matter the reasons why your fingers are just not the size they used to be, you may be finding it difficult to remove a ring that once fit comfortably. In this blog, we’ll explore different ways of removing a ring from a swollen finger.

So, what do you do if you need to remove a ring? There are a few different things you can try.

The Basic Method

This method will work in some cases if the finger is not severely swollen and before it’s turned purple or discolored. Here are the steps to this method:

  • Raise your hand above your head and keep it raised for several minutes. This will allow the blood to drain from your hand and allow for some swelling to decrease.
  • Apply ice to the finger while keeping the hand raised. You can use indirect ice (ice wrapped in a towel) for 20 minutes or direct ice for 10 minutes.
  • Use a lubricant on the finger to make the ring more slippery on the skin. Two of the best options are Windex and mineral oil. Soap can work if you have nothing else, but keep in mind that it can dry out or irritate the skin making things more difficult.
  • Slowly work the ring upwards and over the knuckle. Do not irritate the skin or pull too hard. If you work on the ring and are too rough, your finger will swell even more and the problem will become much more difficult.
  • Continue icing the finger off and on while you try to remove it from your finger. Do not leave direct ice on your finger for too long.

If you’re lucky, may not even have to follow through with all of these steps, and you may discover that elevation, icing, or using a lubricant respectively will be enough to let you slide the ring off your finger safely. If these methods do not work, though, then you can try the dental floss trick.

The Dental Floss Method

Removing a Ring from a Swollen FingerYou will need a large amount of dental floss to do this. Start by threading it under the ring so you have a “pull” handle of floss facing the wrist. The rest of the floss will be facing your fingers.

Begin wrapping the floss tightly around your finger close to the ring itself. Wrap the floss over and over all the way to the joint or over the joint if the joint itself the problem. Make sure to wrap tightly so that you compress the tissue of your finger.

Now, tightly grab the end of the floss that is dangling on the other side of the ring. You will now want to start unwrapping the floss. As you do, it will force the ring downwards, sliding with the floss. This should allow the ring to slide over the joint and hopefully set you free.

If you don’t have dental floss, other things you can use are thin string or a rubber band. You will just need to use the same method of wrapping and then unwrapping.

If none of these methods work, then it may be time to have the ring cut off. Jewelry stores, fire departments, and emergency rooms will have appropriate cutters available, and this will get the ring off quickly and easily, even if it is not your ideal option.

If your finger is turning purple, becoming discolored, or losing feeling, then you should visit a doctor as soon as possible for removal and hand injury treatment. If you don’t have the ring removed quickly, you could lose your finger in some extreme cases.

Here at Arora Hand Surgery, we care about your finger health. If you are feeling hand/finger, wrist, or elbow discomfort, visit Dr. Avery Arora, a Michigan hand specialist, at one of his southeast Michigan offices located in West Bloomfield, Warren, Macomb Township, or Howell.

 

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Fingers General

First Aid Tip: How to Wrap a Broken Knuckle

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Some people let a broken knuckle heal on its own, but we urge you not to do that.

Getting treatment as soon as possible for a knuckle injury is essential to proper recovery. If you don’t get a broken knuckle treated professionally, your finger may never look or function the same as it did prior to the injury.

For that reason, knowing how to wrap a broken knuckle until you can get in to see a doctor can help the bone set properly, reduce the possibility of further injury, and minimize pain.

How to Wrap a Broken Knuckle

Before wrapping a broken knuckle, examine the injured area to make sure the finger is likely broken, yet not bleeding, burned, or extremely swollen. All of these would require additional or other forms of first aid treatment, including possibly a visit to the emergency room.

Signs of a broken knuckle include:

  • Pain that is typically instant and severe, although you still may be able to bend the knuckle
  • Increased pain when you try to move the finger
  • Swelling, which typically begins about 10 minutes after the initial injury, of the affected finger as well as possibly other fingers, the palm, or the back of the hand
  • Inability to move your hand or affected fingers
  • Bruising that may be visible right away
  • Numbness as swelling increases
  • Finger compression
  • Difficulty making a fist
  • A sunken knuckle, which is the clearest sign of a broken knuckle

A common do-it-yourself first aid treatment in this case is to “buddy wrap” the affected finger with the one beside it.

Cut enough tape to wrap around both fingers, and place a piece of tape between the first and second joints and another piece between the second and third joints. Do not place the tape on the knuckles, but try to use pieces of medical tape that are wide enough to cover significant areas between the joints.

The tape should be firmly secured but not so tight that it causes the fingers to swell or become numb.

Alternatively, you can purchase a finger splint from a local pharmacy or other general retailer.

Make an Appointment with a Hand Doctor Afterward

The above recommendations regarding how to wrap a broken knuckle are intended for general first aid. Our blogs are for informational purposes only and should not be considered medical advice.

After first aid treatment, it’s important to see Dr. Arora in West Bloomfield, Howell, Warren, or Macomb Township for proper treatment of the broken knuckle. Make an appointment to see the hand specialist through our website or by calling our office.

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Fingers General

What Happens if You Cut or Damage a Nerve in Your Finger?

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Even the thought of cutting a nerve in your finger can send a chill up your spine. If you truly do cut the nerve itself, this really is as serious as it sounds, and you should seek care as soon as possible. The sooner you get help for a damaged nerve in your finger, the more likely it is that full functionality can be restored.

However, if the injury is not deep enough to sever the nerve, your hand can usually heal itself without surgery, although you still should seek emergency treatment when necessary.

What are nerves, really?

“This is getting on my nerves.”

“You really cut a nerve with that comment.”

“I’m nervous.”

Do these phrases and idioms really relate to what nerves really are and what they do? Well, yes, they do — in a sense — when you think of it in terms of nerves sending signals to your brain, which controls your emotions.

In simple terms, the body has two primary nervous systems: the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. The central nervous system includes the brain and spinal cord. The peripheral nervous system is located outside of this area throughout the body.

Peripheral nerves transmit electric impulses into or away from the central nervous system as a form of communication. It’s essentially a communication network.

The peripheral nervous system consists of more than 100 billion nerve cells, or neurons. They run throughout the body like wires, connecting the brain to other parts of the body or various parts of the body with each other.

The peripheral nerves are made of bundles of nerve fibers, which are wrapped with layers of tissue that form what is known as the myelin sheath. The myelin sheath is responsible for speeding up nerve impulses, the intensity of which vary depending on their and the amount of tissue around them.

This drawing shows the three main nerves of the hand: the ulnar nerve, the median nerve, and the radial nerve.

How many nerves are in your hands?

Although there are a countless number of nerve cells, there are three primary nerve systems in your hands, wrists, and arms.

1. Ulnar nerve

The ulnar nerve is located at the pinky finger and the adjacent side of the ring finger. It provides sensations on the palm side of the hand. It travels up through the elbow and is responsible for the pain we feel when we bump our elbow.

2. Radial nerve

The radial nerve is responsible for sensations at the back of the hand at the little finger and the other half of the ring finger.

3. Median nerve

The median nerve starts at the shoulder and enters the hand through the carpal tunnel in the wrist. The median nerve is responsible for sensations in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and part of the ring finger.

What happens if you cut or damage a nerve in your finger?

Many of us are familiar with the throbbing pain of a cut or injured finger. If you cut your finger and it is bleeding, the first step is to apply pressure to stop the bleeding. If the bleeding does not stop, you should go to your nearest hospital or urgent care facility, as you may need stitches.

If the sheath that covers the nerve remains intact after a cut, only the nerves farthest from the brain will be affected and die. (In other words, the deeper the cut, the closer it is to the nerve itself.) However, those can heal and grow back over time. Surgery is usually not necessary, but you will need to have the injury addressed by a medical professional for optimal healing.

If the injury is deep enough, you should seek emergency care as soon as possible, which may entail surgery to reattach the severed ends of the nerve sheath to one another.

In some cases, the cut may be deep enough that it damages the nerve itself. If that happens, the gap between the two parts of the nerve will have to be repaired, usually through a nerve graft from another part of the body. Another possibility is using a synthetic nerve conduit to bridge the gap in the nerve.

If the nerve in your finger was damaged due to a crushing injury, you may have to wait for the initial crush trauma to heal before the nerve damage can be addressed.

If you have damaged or cut a nerve in your finger, it’s important to seek care as soon as possible. If the need for treatment is urgent, go to your nearest emergency room. Otherwise, contact one of our hand surgery offices, located in West Bloomfield, Warren, Howell, and Macomb, for treatment as soon as possible.

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Fingers General

How Do Nails Grow Back?

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You clip them one day. They’re back two days later.

You chip one one day. It’s back to normal within a day.

You hit one with a hammer, and the bruise goes away within a few weeks.

You overdo your manicures to the point that the nails become thinner, and they’re back to normal within a month.

You paint them one day … ok, well, that one doesn’t make the nail shorter or thinner, but it’s still one of the many things your nails go through in your lifetime — and yet they’re among the most resilient parts of our bodies.

How in the world? How does it happen? How do nails grow back so easily and look relatively the same? Is there a secret magic chamber hiding in our third knuckles? … And why, oh why, can’t our teeth do the same thing?

How Do Nails Grow Back?

How nails grow back is essentially about science.

Nails start out as living cells, which is why they continue to grow, but they harden and die once they become the nails that we see. That’s why it doesn’t hurt when we clip or file them.

Nails are made of a substance called keratin, which is the same thing that our hair is made of. And that makes sense. Both continue to grow throughout our lives, barring a significant injury or medical conditions.

The cuticles on our fingers and toes serve to protect the roots of the nails, which sit behind the cuticles. The root, or matrix, is a pocket of flesh that is connected to blood vessels that supply the nail with nutrients it needs to make new cells.

Fun fact: A fetus starts to grow nails when it is only 20 weeks old, and the baby’s tiny toes and little fingers have full nails by the time it’s born.

So, no, unless you’re Penn or Teller, there’s no magic in your hands — but the resiliency of our nails is still fascinating.

Can You Completely Lose a Fingernail?

Nails almost always grow back, and that’s the case even after accidentally whacking one with a hammer. It might look a little different, but typically you will get it back.

The reason for that is because it would actually be challenging to get under the root of the nail to the matrix in a manner that damages it for life. It’s a tough little pocket.

Only in very rare circumstances is the entire matrix damaged for good, and if that happens, the nail won’t grow back.

To answer your question about teeth — teeth are not made of keratin, and they’re not even “bone,” contrary to popular belief. They’re made up of enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp.

So, no, as we humans are today, we can’t grow our teeth back … yet. It’s a nice little dream, though, isn’t it?

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Fingers General Hands

Clubbed Thumb Surgery: Is it Possible?

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In many ways, clubbed thumbs or toe thumbs are endearing. They’re short, cute, and would certainly stand out if you’re trying to hitch a ride, so you can leave all those “plain-thumbed” hitchhikers in the dust.

Even though there’s medically nothing wrong with having stubbed thumbs, some of their owners often feel somewhat self-conscious about them.

Truly, there’s no need to feel that way. In fact, Dr. Arora would not advise or perform any type of surgery for clubbed thumbs in 99.99% of the cases he has seen.

However, if you are having trouble gripping or writing or have associated hand conditions, surgery for clubbed thumbs may be possible albeit risky.

Facts About Clubbed Thumb Surgery

Before we get into the basic facts about clubbed thumb surgery, let’s define what a clubbed thumb is.

Also known as a “toe thumb” or “stub thumb,” a clubbed thumb is more formally identified as a Brachydactyly type D skeletal variation. It may also be called “Brachymegalodactylism” . . . such a big word for such a little thumb, right?

Speaking of “little,” a clubbed thumb is simply about 2/3 the size of a longer thumb. The nail bed may be shorter and wider as well. Stub thumbs are genetic, just like the color of someone’s eyes or hair.

There is no simple surgical solution for clubbed thumbs. Risks include scarring, loss of sensation, and abnormal nail growth.

Surgery options for this type of brachydactyly are not formalized in any way in the United States. Some treatments may be completed in other countries, but they are not typical for the U.S.

The primary type of surgery for clubbed thumbs is an osteotomy. During an osteotomy, the bone is cut, and a bone grafting material is used to reshape the thumb, making it longer and narrower as needed.

However, your hand is a complex system. If you were born with clubbed thumbs, they most likely function optimally with the rest of your hand, just like a well-oiled machine. Narrowing the thumb or making it longer may change the dynamics of your hand’s functionality.

Dr. Arora’s philosophy is generally, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Because clubbed thumb surgery is typically not advisable, just keep this in mind. Up to 3 percent of people in any given population have stub thumbs, so you’re not alone. In fact, some very beautiful and famous celebrities have toe thumbs.

If nothing else, consider it a gift — a beautiful feature that highlights how unique you really are.

Schedule a Consultation with our Hand Specialist in Southeast Michigan

If you are experiencing discomfort or pain in your hands, make an appointment to see Dr. Arora in West Bloomfield, Warren, Macomb Township, or Howell.

To make an appointment, call the hand doctor’s West Bloomfield office or send us a message through our website.

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Fingers General

What is the Medical Term for Trigger Finger?

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The phrase “trigger finger” can be rather deceptive. It’s not about spending too much time at the firing range – although that may do it. It actually refers to the shape that the finger takes when you have this condition, as well as the popping or snapping sound the finger
might make when you are finally able to straighten it out.

Understanding the medical term for trigger finger and what the condition is may help clear the air.

What is the Medical Term for Trigger Finger?

Trigger finger occurs when the pulley at the base of the finger becomes too thick and then constricts around the tendon. As a result, it can be hard to move the tendon, and you may feel pain, popping, or a feeling of resistance when you try to straighten the finger. When this happens, the tendon may swell and cause pain, and this can happen repeatedly over time. In some cases, the tendon becomes locked, and it may be hard to move the finger at all.

The medical term for trigger finger is stenosing tenosynovitis.

What does “stenosing” mean?

Stenosing derives from the word stenosis, which is defined as an abnormal narrowing or contraction of a body passage or opening.

Other types of stenoses as used in the medical sense include aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis, spinal stenosis, and tracheal stenosis, among many others.

What does “tenosynovitis” mean?

“Teno” refers to tendon. “Synovitis” refers to inflammation of a synovial membrane, which contains synovial fluid. Synovial fluid is a lubricating fluid secreted by the tendon sheath, which is what allows a healthy finger to move properly.

Tenosynovitis, therefore, literally means “inflammation of a tendon,” as well as its sheath.

It typically occurs in the hands, wrists, feet, and ankles due to intense, repetitive use, such as when playing a piano. In addition to overuse, it may occur due to an injury that leads to infection, as well as tuberculous or gonorrheal infection.

Combine it all together, and you get stenosing tenosynovitis: inflammation of a tendon that causes abnormal narrowing or contraction.

Don’t worry. You can still call it “trigger finger.”

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Fingers General

Dupuytren’s Contracture vs. Trigger Finger: What is the Difference?

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When it comes to Dupuytren’s contracture vs. trigger finger, the differences are not always clear. On the surface, they have similar effects on the fingers. When you look deeper, however, you will see that the reason why the fingers are functioning the way they do is different.

Facts about Dupuytren’s Contracture vs. Trigger Finger

It’s easy to see why people may confuse the two conditions. They are similar in some ways. First of all, both conditions can affect any finger. Another similarity is the appearance. The affected fingers are typically curved inward toward the palm, although in some cases they can be bent to the left or right.

Otherwise, they are very different conditions. Following is a breakdown of the differences in Dupuytren’s contracture vs. trigger finger.

What is Trigger Finger?

The technical name for trigger finger is stenosing tenosynovitis. Trigger finger is caused when an injury causes a finger to get stuck in a bent position. This occurs when inflammation narrows the sheath around the tendons, leading to the formation of a nodule. When you flex this finger, the nodule must slide through the narrow sheath, causing a snapping sensation.

Treatment for trigger finger may include:

  • The use of medications to relieve pain
  • Therapy that includes rest, stretching exercises, and the use of a splint
  • Steroid injections
  • A percutaneous release procedure, where the hand surgeon uses a needle to break apart the constriction that is blocking proper movement
  • Surgery to loosen the constricted area
Trigger finger is usually caused by an injury and is most common in the thumb, index finger, and middle finger.
Trigger finger is usually caused by an injury and is most common in the thumb, index finger, and middle finger.

What is Dupuytren’s Contracture?

Dupuytren’s contracture develops over time. It begins when tissue forms knots under the skin of the palm. As these knots form, they create a cord that pulls the fingers into a bent position. Everyday activities like gripping silverware can become difficult with this condition.

Similar to one of the trigger finger treatment options, Dupuytren’s contracture can be treated with the needling procedure to break the cord of tissue that is causing a finger to contract. Other treatment options include self-care, Xiaflex enzyme injections, and surgery.

Surgery for Dupuytren’s contracture entails removing all the tissue that is affected, including the skin. A skin graft may be required to repair the wound. Because this is a serious procedure with a lengthy recovery time, it is ideal only for those who have a diminished quality of life due to the condition.

Dupuytren’s contracture develops over time and stems from the tissue in the palm.
Dupuytren’s contracture develops over time and stems from the tissue in the palm.

Differences Between the Two Hand Conditions

Following are some of the primary differences in Dupuytren’s contracture vs. trigger finger.

  1. Trigger finger starts with the fingers while Dupuytren’s contracture stems from the palm.
  2. Dupuytren’s contracture involves the tissue, but trigger finger involves the tendons.
  3. Trigger finger is most common in the thumb, index finger, and middle finger. Dupuytren’s contracture is most likely to occur in the fourth finger and the pinky.
  4. Someone who has trigger finger can straighten the finger if they tried, but someone with Dupuytren’s contracture cannot.
  5. Whereas trigger finger is usually the result of an injury, the causes of Dupuytren’s contracture are not clear.

If you have experienced a recent injury that led to trigger finger or have been seeing the effects of Dupuytren’s contracture progress over a number of years, see our hand specialist in Macomb, Warren, West Bloomfield, or Howell for treatment. Make an appointment by calling our office or sending our hand surgery team a message online.

 

Call Our Hand Care Team

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Fingers General

Broken Knuckle Symptoms & Treatment Options in Southeast Michigan

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If you have a broken knuckle, it’s likely very painful, red, and swollen, and you probably won’t be able to move it for days or weeks. Despite this injury, many people mistakenly assume that it will heal on its own … and it might. But if you don’t seek broken knuckle treatment as soon as possible, the recovery process will take longer than necessary.

More importantly, the knuckle may heal incorrectly, leading to a deformity in the finger and possibly damaging the nerves around it. If that does happen, correcting the problem may require a surgical procedure, so it’s important to get the injury treated rather than face the effects indefinitely.

Signs and Symptoms of Broken Knuckles

The problem is that you can’t tell if a knuckle is broken or only bruised by looking at it. In order to determine the extent of the injury, make an appointment to see our hand specialist at a southeast Michigan office near you.

In the meantime, following are some of the signs that your knuckle may be broken, not only bruised.

  • Difficulty moving that particular finger
  • Swelling of the finger and hand, particularly in that area
  • Bruising
  • Redness
  • Pain
  • A visibly misshapen hand
  • Cut or pierced skin
  • Depressed knuckle
  • Popping or cracking sound when you try to move it

Many patients say that their hand began to swell about 10 minutes after the injury, but the bruising may become visible instantly.

Having a depressed knuckle is one of the clearest signs that the knuckle is broken rather than bruised. The length of time that it takes to recover is also a sign. A bruised knuckle generally heals within a few days without long-term effects. A broken knuckle may take several weeks to heal completely, and even then you may never get proper function back in that finger if you did not seek treatment right away.

Broken Knuckle Treatment Options

Known as metacarpal fractures, common causes of broken knuckles include punching something, getting your finger stuck in a door or window, getting injured while playing sports, and falling.

Broken knuckle treatment aims to alleviate pain and swelling in the short-term, as well as facilitate proper healing for later.

As a first aid treatment for a broken knuckle, start with applying a cold pack to the area to minimize pain and swelling. Try to keep your hand in an elevated position as well.

When you come in to see Dr. Arora for broken knuckle treatment, he will likely immobilize that finger so that the knuckle can heal. It may involve “buddy taping” that finger to the one beside it or using a splint or cast. The use of over-the-counter or prescription pain medication may help as well. If the injury involved a cut or wound, you may need antibiotics to prevent infection.

Surgical Treatment Options for Finger Injuries

Most of these injuries don’t require surgery, but that may be necessary if you have an open fracture, pieces of the bone are unstable, the tissues are damaged, or multiple fractures exist in the same area.

The type of surgery for broken knuckles depends on the severity and location of the injury. The possibilities include:

  • Internal fixation, which involves making an incision and realigning the knuckle
  • External fixation, which involves using pins to secure a metal frame around your finger or hand to keep the knuckle in place until it heals

After you have healed, you may need to work with a hand therapist to recover the functionality of your hand.

For broken knuckle treatment in southeast Michigan, make an appointment to see Dr. Arora in West Bloomfield, Howell, Warren, or Macomb Township.

Call Our Hand Care Team

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Fingers Treatments

Thumb Joint Surgery: What You Can Expect

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Thumb joint surgery may be required for many reasons.

Maybe you broke part of the bones in your thumb and you now require surgery to fix them. Maybe the ligaments in your thumb are tightening up or feeling pinched, resulting in intense pain.

Symptoms like these are often attributed to arthritis, which is arguably the most common reason why patients have surgery on their thumbs. Arthritis is caused by repetitive movement, so if you’ve had a job for many years that required extensive use of your thumbs, it’s not unlikely to feel pain now and again.

Signs & Symptoms

The big question to ask yourself is, “How often am I feeling this pain?”

If it’s only occasional or doesn’t seem to bother you regularly, other thumb pain relief treatments or answers may exist for you. Pain medication and physical therapy may be two possible options when dealing with only mild or inconsistent pain in the joints of your thumbs.

However, if the pain is constant or too intense to sit through, the problem may be worse than you think. In this case, thumb joint surgery may be your only solution.

Why is this Pain Occurring?

Let’s look at some potential reasons why this may be happening to you. The most common reason for thumb joint arthritis is that the joints are beginning to loosen up. This happens with age; you become weaker, your bones become more brittle, and your muscles can’t hold up the strength they possessed during your youth.

It’s important to avoid heavy or repetitive movements when you age so that your joints don’t become worn out.

You, like all humans, have cartilage that surrounds and cushions the ends of your bones. As you age, this cartilage is likely to wear away or disappear, meaning your bones can rub against one another. This leads to pain and limited movement.

READ MORE ABOUT ARTHRITIS AT THE BASE OF THE THUMB.

Another reason why this may be occurring is because of your gender. It is suggested that thumb joint pain is about ten times more likely to occur in women than in men, though science has not been able to suggest why.

What to Consider

Either way, joint pain in the thumbs can still occur in both women and men, and there are different surgical procedures that can be applied to relieve your thumbs of any discomfort.

Bear in mind that under certain circumstances, your thumbs could take as long as one year after the surgery to feel different. It’s important to keep an eye on your joints and monitor whatever improvements you feel.

In addition, it’s also necessary to monitor your movement and make sure you’re not engaged in any harsh physical activity until your hands feel stronger and more capable. Otherwise, you run the risk of inflicting more pain and doing more damage to yourself, rendering the surgery useless or inefficient.

Thumb Joint Surgery Options

Let’s examine some of the surgical options that are available to relieve your thumb joint pain.

Ligament Reconstruction

Sometimes, the best route to take when working on a project is to simply start over. If you’re having difficulty on a report, document, construction model, or anything else, sometimes starting from scratch after is the best way to go.

This same idea applies to your joints. If your thumb joints have already endured extensive damage over the years, your doctor may just seek to rebuild your ligaments. This often requires parts of the tendons in your wrist be removed and added to the damaged joint muscles in your thumbs. Once connected, mechanical function is restored.

This procedure tends to work best if you catch the symptoms of your arthritis early. If you’re quick to notice the pain and don’t delay when seeking treatment, this surgery can be very successful.

READ MORE ABOUT VARIOUS FORMS OF ARTHRITIS.

However, as with every situation, there is a downside to consider. While your joints become stabilized, not much can be done to replace any lost cartilage or to strengthen your bones.

Fusion

The pain in your thumbs can be reduced or expunged by fusing the bones in your thumb joints together. The surgeon will create a hole in your thumb’s metacarpal bone, insert a pin into the hole, and align the bones together. The pin holds them in place, and with enough time, they’ll eventually fuse and become one single bone.

This procedure usually applies mostly to younger persons who have very physical jobs, such as athletes or warehouse workers. They’re likely to wear out implants and require a “quick fix” so they can return to work in as little time as possible.

While the procedure either reduces or eliminates pain, it does possess a high complication rate, and it can potentially damage other joints or limit your movement capabilities permanently if you’re not careful.

In any case, make an appointment to see our hand surgeon in Howell, West Bloomfield, Warren, or Macomb Township to see which kinds of procedures would offer the best results for you.

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Dr. Aroras office from my first call to schedule my appointment was friendly. Walking in the first day, I felt like I was in a nice atmosphere. Dr. Arora was EXCELLENT in taking great care of my hand injury. He was gentle and very understanding to the concerns I had about my hand. His expertise was admirable and I would recommend anyone with an injury to their hand to his office to be under his care. Because of him, I have healed faster than expected and will make an 100% recovery! Thank you Dr.

Jackie S.

I first thought I was going to have to have painful injections or surgery, but Dr. Arora suggested physical therapy may do the trick. I was doubtful, but I agreed to do it. Now, my pain is gone, and with the help of an ergonomic keyboard at work to keep my hands in the correct position, I am virtually pain free. The therapy strengthened my wrists and shoulders, and built more flexibility into my wrists.

Jerry T.

My experience with this doctor was positive from the outset. Dr. Arora was kind and spent a great deal of time with me. Staff was friendly. The office was nice and bright.

Ariel G.

Very friendly and helpful Great staff!!! Doctor Arora was very professional and did great work. I was very happy with everything!

L B.