Blog Category

Tag: Medical Term for Trigger Finger

Categories
Fingers General

What is the Medical Term for Trigger Finger?

Read Blog

The phrase “trigger finger” can be rather deceptive. It’s not about spending too much time at the firing range – although that may do it. It actually refers to the shape that the finger takes when you have this condition, as well as the popping or snapping sound the finger
might make when you are finally able to straighten it out.

Understanding the medical term for trigger finger and what the condition is may help clear the air.

What is the Medical Term for Trigger Finger?

Trigger finger occurs when the pulley at the base of the finger becomes too thick and then constricts around the tendon. As a result, it can be hard to move the tendon, and you may feel pain, popping, or a feeling of resistance when you try to straighten the finger. When this happens, the tendon may swell and cause pain, and this can happen repeatedly over time. In some cases, the tendon becomes locked, and it may be hard to move the finger at all.

The medical term for trigger finger is stenosing tenosynovitis.

What does “stenosing” mean?

Stenosing derives from the word stenosis, which is defined as an abnormal narrowing or contraction of a body passage or opening.

Other types of stenoses as used in the medical sense include aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis, spinal stenosis, and tracheal stenosis, among many others.

What does “tenosynovitis” mean?

“Teno” refers to tendon. “Synovitis” refers to inflammation of a synovial membrane, which contains synovial fluid. Synovial fluid is a lubricating fluid secreted by the tendon sheath, which is what allows a healthy finger to move properly.

Tenosynovitis, therefore, literally means “inflammation of a tendon,” as well as its sheath.

It typically occurs in the hands, wrists, feet, and ankles due to intense, repetitive use, such as when playing a piano. In addition to overuse, it may occur due to an injury that leads to infection, as well as tuberculous or gonorrheal infection.

Combine it all together, and you get stenosing tenosynovitis: inflammation of a tendon that causes abnormal narrowing or contraction.

Don’t worry. You can still call it “trigger finger.”

Get on the List

Subscribe

Patient

Stories

Read All

Dr. Aroras office from my first call to schedule my appointment was friendly. Walking in the first day, I felt like I was in a nice atmosphere. Dr. Arora was EXCELLENT in taking great care of my hand injury. He was gentle and very understanding to the concerns I had about my hand. His expertise was admirable and I would recommend anyone with an injury to their hand to his office to be under his care. Because of him, I have healed faster than expected and will make an 100% recovery! Thank you Dr.

Jackie S.

I first thought I was going to have to have painful injections or surgery, but Dr. Arora suggested physical therapy may do the trick. I was doubtful, but I agreed to do it. Now, my pain is gone, and with the help of an ergonomic keyboard at work to keep my hands in the correct position, I am virtually pain free. The therapy strengthened my wrists and shoulders, and built more flexibility into my wrists.

Jerry T.

My experience with this doctor was positive from the outset. Dr. Arora was kind and spent a great deal of time with me. Staff was friendly. The office was nice and bright.

Ariel G.

Very friendly and helpful Great staff!!! Doctor Arora was very professional and did great work. I was very happy with everything!

L B.